Articles

  • Prioritizing Your Wellness: Where to Find Mental Health Support, Treatment and More

    Coping with mental health can feel lonely, but it doesn't have to be. No matter who you are, how you identify or what you believe in, there is a resource available to help. If you or a loved one is struggling, seek support at one of these organizations.

  • Decolonizing Mental Health: Transforming Care for BIPOC Communities

    DECOLONIZING MENTAL HEALTH dismantles the racism that underscores the mental healthcare industry by focusing its gaze on the transformative work of therapists and individuals of color to call for a redressal of the ways in which we define psychiatric illness and mental health. In the series, we take a look beyond the echo chambers of mental healthcare.

  • Filmmaker Q&A: 'Far East Deep South' Uncovers a Personal Journey That Leads to Deep Historical Connections

    In ‘Far East, Deep South,’ Charles Chiu and his Chinese American family travel from California to the Mississippi Delta in search of their shared past and uncover a peek into an often-overlooked piece of American history. Director & producer Larissa Lam and producer Baldwin Chiu talk about how their relationship with Charles added to the film’s production.

  • PRIDE Viewer's Guide

    June is Pride Month, and in support of and advocacy for the LGBTQIA+ community, WORLD Channel is ready to celebrate with the sweet freedom of authenticity. Watch along with us with films that support and advocate for stories, communities and relationships that reflect what it means to have pride.

  • Race in America Viewer's Guide

    2020 marked a year in which Americans were forced to confront racism in the country. As we remember George Floyd, it's crucial to reflect on the events of the past year and to continue the work of how to effectively create solutions to address racial injustice. It’s become clear that talking about race can be uncomfortable, but it is necessary to have these conversations in order to work towards a more equitable society. Watch along with us this month as we embrace the complexities of stories about race in America.

  • The Conversation Remix

    A remix of the 2015 New York Times 'A Conversation about Race,' this series is a vibrant collage of people’s lives and experiences, which powerfully frame and illustrate the racial reckoning that is happening around us.

  • ‘Playing Russian Roulette With Our Own Lives’: At Black-Owned Funeral Homes in New Orleans, COVID Takes a Harsh Toll

    Following the staff at two of the oldest Black-owned funeral homes in the city, the film documents their efforts to reimagine traditional cultural grieving practices for the COVID-19 era and bring comfort to a hard-hit city — while trying to keep from falling ill themselves.

  • Q&A with Amy Tan

    Told through archival imagery including home movies, personal photographs and original interviews, Amy Tan: Unintended Memoir is an intimate portrait of the best-selling author's inspiring story that celebrates her life and career.

  • Asian American Pacific Islander Month Viewer's Guide

    As COVID-19 spread around the world, so did anti-Asian rhetoric. The number of hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States rose by nearly 150% from 2019 to 2020 as hate crimes overall decreased by 7%. Even with the Senate's passing of the anti-Asian hate crimes bill (it must still be voted on by the House), the fight against racial injustice in America continues. During Asian American Pacific Islander Month, WORLD Channel will amplify the voices of the many in the AAPI community by sharing stories of defiance, solidarity and humanity.

  • A Viewer's Guide to EYES ON THE PRIZE

    The 1987 Oscar-nominated Eyes On The Prize documents the comprehensive history of the Civil Rights Movement in America. The landmark series is told in 14 parts through the firsthand experiences of ordinary people whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the American landscape. From the singular act of courage by of Rosa Parks to John Lewis and the hundreds of marchers from Selma to Montgomery, it’s clear that the fight to end discrimination and segregation was an arduous but necessary road traveled.