Saturday, January 31, 2015

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  • 8:00 a.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVPG

  • 10:00 a.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Into The Wild: Edison, Ford & Friends

    Between 1914 and 1924, a group of famous friends - prolific inventor Thomas Edison, pioneering auto-maker Henry Ford, best-selling nature writer John Burroughs, and later, tire manufacturer Harvey Firestone - traveled to the remote reaches of Florida's Everglades in search of a rustic camping adventure far from the pressures of work and the press. Freed from the demands of daily life, the friends and their entourage enjoyed the serendipity of life on the road, stopping to help farmers in the field, examining streams for hydroelectric possibilities or engaging in an impromptu tree-chopping contest. INTO THE WILD: EDISON, FORD & FRIENDS features excerpts from the journals and letters of Burroughs and Firestone as well as interviews with historians and biographers. Combined with historic family photographs, vintage press footage and period music, this half-hour documentary offers insight into the famous friends and a rare glimpse of the men behind their public personas.

  • 10:30 a.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Untold Stories: Mina Miller Edison, The Wizard's Wife

    Mina Miller Edison, while perhaps best-known as Thomas Edison's wife, was a remarkable woman in her own right. Mina's diary entries hint at a side of the prolific inventor not always seen by the public, while her personal - and often candid - letters to friends and family reflect her own struggles and accomplishments. UNTOLD STORIES: MINA MILLER EDISON, THE WIZARD'S WIFE explores Mina's direct and lasting impact, specifically on the Edison's winter estate in Fort Myers, Florida and their Glenmont estate in New Jersey. Like the private and public gardens she sowed and tended, Mina Miller Edison's charity work planted the seeds for growth, change and beautification that can still be seen today.

  • 11:00 a.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack: Changing Charity

    Guests: Jed Bernstein, President, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts; Jack Lund, CEO, YMCA of Greater New York. This week's Consuelo Mack WealthTrack explores changes in charitable giving. Two heads of leading philanthropies, Jed Bernstein of Lincoln Center and Jack Lund of the YMCA of Greater New York, discuss how organizations are meeting the new donor demands.

  • 11:30 a.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly

    Science for Seminarians -The American Association for the Advancement of Science is supporting the study of science in seminaries for future ministers. Lucky Severson reports on the debate that has set off: some say understanding science should help create more effective ministers. Others fear that learning how scientists see the world might weaken faith. Helping India's Slum Dwellers Find Dignity - In the teeming slums of Mumbai (Bombay) in India, a caring man has founded an organization called Slum Dwellers International to help the very poor demand and get better treatment from the government bureaucracy. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports that perhaps the thing most coveted by the slum families is a private toilet, and the key to putting pressure on indifferent bureaucrats is the organizing of the slums' women. Remembering Thomas Merton - If the Trappist monk and prolific writer had lived long enough he would have celebrated his 100th birthday on Januray 31st. Judy Valente recalls Merton's gift for encouraging not just monks but everyone in their spiritual practices and their discovery of the presence of God.

  • 12:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVM

  • 1:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVPG

    P.O.V.: Listening Is An Act of Love: A Storycorps Special

    This first-ever animated special from StoryCorps celebrates the transformative power of listening. "Listening Is an Act of Love" features six stories from 10 years of the innovative oral history project, where everyday people sit down together to share memories and tackle life's important questions. Framing these intimate conversations from across the country is an interview between StoryCorps founder Dave Isay and his inquisitive 9-year-old nephew, Benji, animated in the inimitable visual style of The Rauch Brothers.

  • 2:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVPG

  • 4:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Into The Wild: Edison, Ford & Friends

    Between 1914 and 1924, a group of famous friends - prolific inventor Thomas Edison, pioneering auto-maker Henry Ford, best-selling nature writer John Burroughs, and later, tire manufacturer Harvey Firestone - traveled to the remote reaches of Florida's Everglades in search of a rustic camping adventure far from the pressures of work and the press. Freed from the demands of daily life, the friends and their entourage enjoyed the serendipity of life on the road, stopping to help farmers in the field, examining streams for hydroelectric possibilities or engaging in an impromptu tree-chopping contest. INTO THE WILD: EDISON, FORD & FRIENDS features excerpts from the journals and letters of Burroughs and Firestone as well as interviews with historians and biographers. Combined with historic family photographs, vintage press footage and period music, this half-hour documentary offers insight into the famous friends and a rare glimpse of the men behind their public personas.

  • 4:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Untold Stories: Mina Miller Edison, The Wizard's Wife

    Mina Miller Edison, while perhaps best-known as Thomas Edison's wife, was a remarkable woman in her own right. Mina's diary entries hint at a side of the prolific inventor not always seen by the public, while her personal - and often candid - letters to friends and family reflect her own struggles and accomplishments. UNTOLD STORIES: MINA MILLER EDISON, THE WIZARD'S WIFE explores Mina's direct and lasting impact, specifically on the Edison's winter estate in Fort Myers, Florida and their Glenmont estate in New Jersey. Like the private and public gardens she sowed and tended, Mina Miller Edison's charity work planted the seeds for growth, change and beautification that can still be seen today.

  • 5:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe

    This Week on TO THE CONTRARY: Topic 1: Campus Rape Legislation; Topic 2: Behind the Headlines: Male Allies in Feminism; Topic 3: NFL PSA. PANELISTS: Anushay Hossain, Rina Shah Bharara, Patricia Sosa , Amber Barno Smith.

  • 5:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    Asian Voices

  • 6:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Global 3000: Cuban Doctors - Slave Labor In Brazil?

    Coral Reefs Protect Biodiversity in Fiji - The Great Sea Reef protects the coast of Vanua Levu island on Fiji from storm floods and erosion. The reef is also home to an amazingly diverse number of species, some of which are endangered. To safeguard its future, everyone needs to be brought on board: local fishermen, tourists and politicians. In the past, fishermen in the north of the Fiji Islands used to divide up their fishing grounds in the Great Sea Reef. That's no longer the case. The economic pressure is too great. Continual overfishing is endangering biodiversity. The 200 km long reef offers a home to 12 particularly endangered species of fish and coral, including the Green Turtle and the Spinner Dolphin. New ideas are urgently needed to protect its sensitive eco-system. Fiji has committed itself to protecting a third of its ocean territory by the year 2020 and that includes the Great Sea Reef. Young Global Leaders: The Rise of Suhas Gopinath - Suhas Gopinath was just 14 years old when he set up Globals Incorporated from an Internet shop in Bangalore. His multi-million dollar software company has now turned into an international success. Suhas Gopinath its optimistic about the future of India. He says the new government, which took over power almost a year ago, is showing a lot of initiative and is business-friendly. And India needs a lot of new entrepreneurs to fight the country's high levels of unemployment and poverty. Gopinath wants to do his bit. He's advising the government on business start-ups. Cuban Doctors in Brazil - The Brazilian town of Guia Lopes da Laguna was without a doctor for over a month. Until Denis C. arrived. Denis comes from Cuban and is an experienced and well-qualified general practitioner. Medical provision in Brazil's major cities is good, but the situation is quite different in rural areas where thousands of doctors' posts cannot be filled. President Dilma Rousseff has reacted to vociferous protests about the ailing health service ahead of the Soccer World Cup with a scheme called "Mais Medicos" or "More Doctors". It has successfully attracted 13,000 Cuban doctors to the country. Nationwide polls show that most Brazilians are happy with the program. But it has its critics who call the Cuban doctors "slaves" - as they're only allowed to keep one-third of their salaries. Albinos Face Deadly Superstition in Kenya - Albinos face discrimination in many parts of Africa. In some areas of East Africa they're even murdered for their body parts, which are said to have particular magic powers. With their white skin that needs to be constantly protected from the sun and their extremely light-sensitive eyes - life for albinos in Africa is particularly difficult. In Kenyan society, they are also frequently stigmatized and isolated. What's worse, in Tanzania they're even murdered for their body parts, which are said to possess magic powers. The Canadian organization "Under the Same Sun" has recorded 129 murders in a recent study. Most of them were in the region close to the great lakes.

  • 6:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Scully/The World Show

  • 7:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly

    Science for Seminarians -The American Association for the Advancement of Science is supporting the study of science in seminaries for future ministers. Lucky Severson reports on the debate that has set off: some say understanding science should help create more effective ministers. Others fear that learning how scientists see the world might weaken faith. Helping India's Slum Dwellers Find Dignity - In the teeming slums of Mumbai (Bombay) in India, a caring man has founded an organization called Slum Dwellers International to help the very poor demand and get better treatment from the government bureaucracy. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports that perhaps the thing most coveted by the slum families is a private toilet, and the key to putting pressure on indifferent bureaucrats is the organizing of the slums' women. Remembering Thomas Merton - If the Trappist monk and prolific writer had lived long enough he would have celebrated his 100th birthday on Januray 31st. Judy Valente recalls Merton's gift for encouraging not just monks but everyone in their spiritual practices and their discovery of the presence of God.

  • 7:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    Asia This Week

  • 8:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill

  • 8:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    McLaughlin Group

  • 9:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVRE

    Charlie Rose - The Week

  • 9:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Focus On Europe: An End to Austerity In Greece

    Belgium: The fight against terror - Belgium is regarded as one of the strongholds for jihadists in Europe. It's believed that up to 400 people have returned to Belgium after fighting on the side of extremists in Syria. Security forces are on high alert after a planned terrorist attack on police officers was foiled at the last minute. In terms of the total population, Belgium has the highest percentage of returning "holy warriors" in Europe. The "Sharia4Belgium" group stands accused of recruiting young people to fight in Syria. And some say Belgium's security forces are not doing enough to monitor the actions of returning jihadists. Germany: Taking a stand against xenophobia - In recent months, a group that calls itself PEGIDA, an acronym that translates as "Patriotic Europeans against the Islamization of the West", has been holding near-weekly rallies in Dresden. At the rallies, marchers wave German flags and chant xenophobic, anti-refugee, and anti-Muslim slogans. But a counter-movement is gaining ground. Tens of thousands of people have taken part in marches against the PEGIDA movement in cities across Germany. In many cases they far outnumber the PEGIDA protesters. Only in Dresden, have their numbers remained modest. After the recent Islamist attacks in Paris, many are concerned that PEGIDA will attract new followers, and that Germany's Muslims will face increasing suspicion and hostility. Most German politicians and much of the German public have denounced PEGIDA. Greece: An end to austerity? Greece has been suffering a recession for years. More and more middle class families have slid into poverty as a result. Now the Greek electorate has voted the governing party out of office. Greeks who are struggling economically want to bring an end to austerity policies. Many Greeks are suffering under the country's high unemployment and sparse social welfare support. In some schools, teachers have taken to organizing meals for children from impoverished families. Now the left-wing Syriza party under Alexis Tsipras has won the election. He's made many promises to the Greek electorate and his platform includes an overhaul of the EU's bailout package. But some European politicians have already sent signals that they do not intend to renegotiate the international bailout that imposed austerity on Greece. Serbia: The guardian of the Danube - In Serbia, he's hailed as a hero. Renato Grbic is a professional fisherman who over the years has saved 26 people who tried to commit suicide by jumping off a bridge into the Danube. Many of the people he rescued remain grateful to him to this day. Serbia has one of the highest suicide rates in Europe. Many of them are people driven to despair by unemployment, lack of opportunity, and the effects of pervasive corruption. Switzerland: The Charlie Chaplin Museum - Thirty-five years after his death, Charlie Chaplin is being honored with a museum. It's located in a villa near Lake Geneva, where the legend of the silent screen spent the last 25 years of his life. Charlie Chaplin settled in Switzerland in the early 1950s after he was denied re-entry to the US, accused of being a Communist sympathizer. It was during the McCarthy era. He spent the next quarter-century living on the Manoir de Ban estate with his wife Oona and their children. "Chaplin's World" museum is scheduled to open next year.

  • 10:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31

  • 11:00 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

  • 11:30 p.m. Eastern

    Jan 31, TVG

    Visa Dream

    VISA DREAM tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States. Representatives from the U.S. Consulate demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications - and deny others. The film's main characters are Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, who have not seen their children in 16 years. They are a family divided, connected only by photo albums and phone calls. The daughters may not visit Mexico because they do not possess the necessary documents; going there would mean forever leaving behind their spouses, children, homes and lives. One daughter tearfully explains the hardships many immigrant families endure as a result of this prolonged separation. Ramon, the patriarch of the family, would rather live in Mexico but he longs to reunite with his family, who live 2,500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition. Previous attempts proved unsuccessful but the Chavezes decide to try again after years of postponement. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the U.S. Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara. There, visa document specialists and a U.S. Consulate officer describe their roles, detail the reasons why certain individuals receive visas while others do not and explain what their interview questions aim to reveal. VISA DREAM's closing moments capture the tension as the family eagerly awaits the results of the interview. Jubilant scenes follow as the family responds with shock, tears and excitement when they hear the decision. The film concludes with Ramon and Aurora's first trip to California and the heartwarming reunion with their children and grandchildren.

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